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Property Investment is Still Good Business: Here’s How to Get Started

Property Investment is Still Good Business: Here’s How to Get Started

The Chancellor has swung his axe, and many landlords within the UK are rethinking their decisions to invest in the buy-to-let business. Impacting the property market are several factors, including mortgage rates, tax, and stamp duty. When the Government decided to review them, panic set in amongst property investors.

To set the scene, investors usually get their money (mortgage) from a bank or some financial lenders to acquire a property. As was previously in place, the Government operated a mortgage interest relief system, which allowed landlords of residential properties to reduce the cost of financing their newly acquired property, but changes to tax relief for residential landlords will see that the cost for finance is restricted to the basic rate of income Tax. And on top of that, the newly introduced Stamp Duty Land Tax means that landlords will now, from 1 April, 2016, pay an additional 3% on any new property acquired.

However, many experts believe that property investment business is still good business in 2016. In fact, The Week reports, “The property portal Rightmove has revealed that enquiries on its website from would-be investors rose by 30 per cent between June and September. It says that the number of new properties being offered for rent rose six per cent nationally and 15 per cent in London during this period.”

With the panic in the sector ebbing gradually, investors could yet gain, but they must learn the tips to investing wisely. Here are five of them.

  1. Research is the Key

Conducting a full survey of lending rates, tax rates, and capital gains is the first step. You wouldn’t want to buy a property and then discover that your mortgage is due, when the property has not started yielding gains.  A survey is necessary since rates are not always stable. Since mortgage rate is crucial to the survival of property investment, you would do well to look at the rates of several lenders before making a final choice.

  1. Add Value to Your Property

By offering things that tenants are really looking for in a property, you could attract the best tenants who are willing to pay a premium for your property. There are plenty of guides about exactly how to improve your property online.

  1. Choose Your Target Location Wisely

Manchester-based property investor Robert Jones calls the kick to the property investment sector an opportunity. Rather than buying a property in a place where you want to live, you should consider buying one in a place where tenants are willing to move to. Ultimately, this means researching your prospective tenants’ demographics such as family size, income level, and age groups.

  1. Investing Professionally

Seeking financial and tax advice from professional property experts is invaluable before making your investment decisions.

  1. Simon Lambert from Thisismoney.co.uk advises that you go for rental yield. “To compare different property’s values use their yield: that is annual rent received as a percentage of the purchase price.” Say your property’s rent is £5,000 and the cost £145,000, your rental yield would be 3.5%. This method lets you know exactly how much you should gain over a long term basis.

Finally, before you invest in a property, ask anyone you know who has been there and done that. All of these tips will definitely save you from trouble when the grim days come again.

Millennial? You Should Be Thinking About These Financial Investments Now

Millennial? You Should Be Thinking About These Financial Investments Now

Saving isn’t always attractive or accessible for young people because of the competitive job market and huge debts loans to be offset by graduates. But with good counsel from a trusted advisor and the prospects of investing early, a young person will find that securing their future happiness and comfort starts now.

Here are tips to guide you for your first investment steps.

Find a Trusted Financial Advisor and Start Investing Now

If there was one thing the global recession ever taught millennials, it is that they can no longer put off savings and that they should form a habit of investing for the future early.

But if it is your first time of dipping your toe in the world of savings and investments, it can be overwhelming deciding which choice to make from mutual funds to stocks and bonds or how to appropriately diversify your portfolio.

The natural temptation is to seek advice from your parents, friends, colleagues or older relatives, but their judgments may – unknowingly to both them and you – be clouded. Find a financial advisor you can trust and who can give you professional and unbiased counsel that fits best for your demographic and specific needs. The goal should be to secure your future, while insuring your financial health for today. For example, the investment strategy or priorities your trusted advisor will outline for your demographic will be different from the advice the give to an older, more established person.

Get Out of a Job that Leads to Nowhere

Does your job match your life or investment goals? Or do you feel trapped in a cul-de-sac that drains your time, energy and creative juices and leaves you high and dry every week without commensurate compensation, bonuses or raises? Then stop wasting your time, get out of the ditch and shop the market now for a better option that allows you to invest in your future.

Match any Income Raise with a Raise in Your Savings

If you do get a raise or bonus, don’t splurge on new luxuries or turn up the volume on your lifestyle. Rather, it is the perfect opportunity to better secure your future with an increase in your retirement savings, find out about funeral plan costs to prepare for unseen events or add contributions to your investment portfolios.

Invest in Yourself

Take advantage of the stacks of useful resources and information available on the web and elsewhere and improve your knowledge to get ahead in the ever competitive market. You can learn new skills that will allow you to start a new business or add new streams of income to boost your financial muscles.

Avoid the Credit Card Temptation

When you graduate from the university, you’ll often be inundated with credit card offers. But it’s better to skip them, especially if you still have students loan to pay off. Otherwise you will get trapped in a dizzying cycle that holds you back from your financial goals.

Alternative Funding Options for Your Business Venture

Alternative Funding Options for Your Business Venture

You probably guessed it – the option to which business venture funding alternatives are most sought is getting a bank loan. While making for a seriously bitter pill for entrepreneurs with a bright idea to swallow, the bottom line is that in order to get financed by a bank, especially for something like a business venture, you pretty much just have to prove to them that you don’t need the money you’re trying to borrow from them. That’s perhaps a huge contributing factor to the failure of many businesses which showed a lot of early promise. It’s perhaps also the main reason why many entrepreneurs take their potentially world-changing bright ideas to the grave.

There are however some alternative options for funding your business venture, most of which are actually much better than anything the bank would offer you in any case. Sadly though, entrepreneurs tend to turn to these alternatives only when they’ve been shot down by their favourite traditional bank.

Angel Investors

I’d personally say that angel investors are the best choice for seeking funding for a business venture or for the development of a new idea. This is because angel investors can sympathise with the up-and-coming entrepreneur, qualifying as angel investors by virtue of having been up-and-coming entrepreneurs or founders themselves. Still, if an angel investor doesn’t go on to give your idea or business the thumbs-up, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a bad idea which won’t work. There are many angel investors who just get sick at the thought of having turned down an opportunity to invest in a start-up which has since blown up beyond their wildest imagination.

Angel investors will generally point you down other avenues of getting funding if they themselves aren’t in a position to invest as well, so never pass up on an opportunity to solicit funding from an angel investor.

Crowdfunding Platforms

Crowd-sourcing start-up capital for your business venture is perhaps right on par with getting an angel investment, with the only area in which I think it falls short being that of an angel investment effectively coming with the mentorship of the angel investor, someone who is likely an experienced entrepreneur themselves with lots of insight to share and an established network to help grow your business through. Otherwise crowdfunding as a means through which to source capital for your business is a very popular way for new businesses to get up-and-running. Contributors come in various shapes, forms and sizes, some of which will just contribute outright without expecting any form of ownership or return on investment.

CSI (Corporate Social Investments)

Corporate Social Investments make for another great banking alternative to getting some funding for your venture. Their only drawback is that a legitimate CS Investment is extremely hard to come by. Essentially, companies which would otherwise be subjected to hefty taxes look to off-set paying such high taxes by giving away money to fund the development of other businesses, companies, start-ups, communities, etc. With this particular method of getting funding for your business, the hard work entails building up networks and then getting identified as a possible candidate for a CSI. You’ll probably have to wait a very long time to get any indication that you may possibly be in for such an investment, which would probably put the brakes on the development of your idea or the growth of your business while you wait.

R&D Tax Breaks and Rebates

If your idea or core operational structure of your business falls in line with anything the government has earmarked as a targeted area of development, perhaps the funding you so desire can come in the form of a Research and Development (R&D) tax break. What happens is as a result of the outcome of your idea or business possibly solving a problem the government has or one which will address the needs of a very large number of people, the government provides the funding for the research which goes into the development of that idea.

R&D tax breaks are also quite hard to come by, something which is attested to by the fact that you probably have to go through a traditional financial institution like a bank to apply for R&D tax breaks and rebates.

Exploring the Financial Lifecycle of a Cash-Cow Industry

Exploring the Financial Lifecycle of a Cash-Cow Industry

In every generation there’s at least one event or one product which changes things around completely, making a few people extremely wealthy while spawning a lot of secondary markets which run parallel to whatever that major paradigm shift is. It happens in just about every area of our lives, from solving a problem which is associated with our basic needs to even something like entertainment.

Major events, discoveries, inventions etc. such as oil, the VCR machine, the internet etc. are perfect examples of such paradigm shifts. The development of a major cash-cow industry often takes place within another major paradigm shift, such as social networking as one way in which the internet developed, or fuel to power our cars as a way in which the discovery of oil was developed. With regards to the financial lifecycle of these major cash-cow industries, an understanding thereof could perhaps help you become a better investor if you have some money set aside to perhaps take a chance on industries falling outside of your regular way of earning a living.

Stage One – The Initial Boom

The initial boom stage of a major cash-cow industry is often just a precursor to what will effectively be a second boom, where all the real money will change hands. Let’s take the internet as an example – when the internet first really took shape, it was nothing more than a network of connected computers and the very idea fascinated only a few geeky people in the entire world. No serious money really changed hands during the initial growth phase of the internet and investors weren’t exactly queuing up to “invest in the internet.” The only money which can be directly associated with this stage is that of early adopters who sort of see the new paradigm as something which they just enjoy exploring, entertaining and developing, or indeed something which they can develop into something really useful in future. This leads us to the next stage.

Stage Two – The Explosion

When someone finally makes use of the discovery, paradigm or invention to create something really useful, a financial explosion of sorts takes place. This leveraging of the original paradigm to create something that explodes into popularity can take any form, but the most common form is if it solves some sort of problem. Sticking with our example of the internet, you can think of the Google search engine (now part of the parent company called Alphabet) as a great example of someone (or two guys) taking the original invention of the World Wide Web and creating something which solves a problem and goes on to become a runaway success.

This is when the true power of the original invention or original idea / discovery / paradigm comes into focus as something which can be really useful – something which has some real power, during which time a lot of investment comes pouring into this and other similar developments. It essentially becomes a race against time and a competition to see who will ultimately “get it right” and explode into prominence. This is when to place investment bets because you can make some serious cash if the development you bet on eventually goes on to list or perhaps gets acquired.

Stage Three – The Derivative Phase

Operating within patent laws, the main paradigm which proves to be popular naturally sparks some competition, in the form of developers trying to develop a better product which does the same job, but one which will be in direct competition with the most popular product. Think Yahoo and Bing which tried to take on Google to dominate the search engine market. There were many other search engines as well, but I mean we can only declare one clear winner.

Stage Four – The Peak

At this stage it’s perhaps too late to look towards investing because the only real way you can do that is through buying stocks, which are already expensive and have already made a lot of people rich. Some cash-cow industries die out at this stage, while others like Google diversify and explore other avenues through which to reinvent the cash-cow and keep the profits flowing in. If you’re lucky, you can still make a lot of money through these diversifications.

Investing Vs. Trading

Investing Vs. Trading

Due in large part to the booming online trading market, people often get confused about whether what they’re doing via their online platform of choice is in fact trading or investing. The lines become blurred a bit when brokers operating an online trading platform offer both of these financial instruments with which to buy and sell securities.

The lines are blurred further when one takes into account the fact that someone using these financial instruments can indeed be both a trader and an investor at the same time, with a single transaction effectively doubling-up as being a trade and an investment at the same time. Fundamentally however, there is a difference between trading and investing and there is a difference between a trader and an investor.

Investing

It’s perhaps pertinent to start off with investing because trading is essentially a spin-off of investing. An investor is fundamentally someone who takes a long term view on putting their money into something from which they expect or predict some growth – growth which will hopefully result in some financial success in the future. So even if you make use of an online brokerage platform from the point of view of an investor, your outlook is generally a long term one, which means you would buy shares in listed companies (stocks), commodities or some sort of stake in a company or venture with plans to only really cash-in properly once some growth has taken place.

Trading

Trading generally takes more of a short-term outlook in that a trader essentially seeks to take advantage of the immediate movement in the markets. The typical instrument offered to traders online is that of Contracts For Differences (CFDs). CFDs are precisely what is written on the tin – a contract you enter into as a result of your prediction of whether or not one or more share prices you’ve selected to bet on are going to increase in value or decrease. CFDs are precisely why there’s been a recent explosion in online trading platforms, quite simply because the brokerage sites don’t really own anything and they don’t produce anything either. So it’s just a matter of going through the requisite compliance processes to qualify as a broker and then make some insane money charging people commission for each trade they make.

Intraday traders are perhaps the most common types of traders, who are naturally drawn to volatile stocks so that they can take advantage of the constant movements of the values of those stocks.

So Which is Better – Investing or Trading?

In my expert opinion as someone who works in the financial industry, I’d honestly proclaim investing to be a better option, but only if it was a question of either-or. Investing is better in my opinion because if you look at the All Share Index of any stock exchange in the world, generally such a portfolio of shares increases in value over time. Your earnings would naturally be slow in this way, but they’d also generally be steady earnings which can be as good as beating inflation at times.

So even if you seek the thrill of the intraday trader and you have a preference for making (or losing) money quickly, your trading efforts should be complemented with a good portfolio of investments. That way, you can benefit from investor-advantages such as earning dividends on certain stocks you hold, while your trading efforts could play off on your investment portfolio to hedge against what would otherwise be serious, fast losses while you’re chasing your next short-term trade.

Ultimately, mixing things up is the way to go, but I seriously wouldn’t recommend for anyone to put all their eggs in the trader’s nest.

Is it Worth Getting into Cryptocurrencies?

Is it Worth Getting into Cryptocurrencies?

If you had invested in perhaps the most popular cryptocurreny, Bitcoin, a mere three years ago or so, you’d be smiling right about now because Bitcoin has indeed grown quite nicely in its valuation against fiat currencies. There are many other cryptocurrencies which are fighting for their share of the market, all making use of what appears to be a revolutionary way of making use of the rather simple concept of a publically available ledger, otherwise known as the blockchain.

There was indeed a recent blip in the otherwise upward trend depicted by the valuation placed on Bitcoin specifically, but otherwise this seems to be the future of finance – well certainly in the minds of a lot of people who complete a lot of their trades and transactions online. The main idea is for there to be some sort of independence from the central banking system which largely governs the entire world’s financial system, so if for instance you want to buy something from someone or you want to sell something to them, there is no involvement of the banks and other financial institutions, which means there are no service fees.

What it also means is that there’s no one on the other side who could possibly delay or completely block a transaction between two parties who agree on the terms of the transaction, so naturally one would generally see a future for such technology. I’ll let you in on a little secret too – the blockchain’s use for payment channels such as Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies has the big players in the financial industry losing some sleep over what appears to be a monopoly on the procurement of money. Cryptocurrencies are definitely seen as a bit of threat to the institutionalised financial sector establishments, but since the value of digital currencies such as Bitcoin is measured against fiat currencies, for now these institutions can rest easy.

While there’s definitely a future for cryptocurrencies, the burning question is indeed whether or not it’s worth getting into the game at what seems to be such a late stage.

Well, the short answer is yes, definitely, you just have to be a little bit clever about it. Mining is definitely out of the question, unless you’re targeting emerging cryptocurrencies. Even if you team up with other miners to better your collective chances of discovering some new Bitcoins, it’s really getting harder and harder to uncover new cryptocurrencies and the hardware you have to purchase (miner) to start mining is expensive to buy and expensive to operate. It consumes a lot of power and will plough through your data, while you’ll honestly hardly see any success in mining new cryptocurrency units. If you want to take a bet on emerging cryptocurrencies through mining, that alone isn’t enough to justify the cost of running a cryptocurrency miner all by yourself.

The good thing about cryptocurrency miners, if you get the right one that is, is that you can use it for many other purposes related to the fundamentals of blockchain technology. These uses are beyond the scope of this particular post, but all I’ll say is that it has a lot to do with validating “stuff” like transactions and records by way of a public ledger.

At this stage it can still be worth getting into cryptocurrencies however, but either by direct investment or trading, or by pooling your money with investing clubs that specialise in cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin itself is forecast to reach figures of over $1000 per coin unit in the near future, so it’s perhaps worth a punt if you are indeed looking for some short term gains, otherwise it’s still worth a punt if you’re looking towards long-term gains.

Just keep in mind that there is an originally intended purpose for the development of cryptocurrencies and the blockchain technology they use, which is to decentralise the financial service involved with buying and selling.

Online Trading – Who Makes the Real Money?

Online Trading – Who Makes the Real Money?

Have you noticed how over the last couple of years or so, there seems to have been a serious spike in the number of online trading platforms? In addition, more airtime on business channels seems to be allocated to shows about trading and investing, particularly trading and investing in the stock markets, whether directly (buying shares) or indirectly (trading derivatives). It’s not just a coincidence and good on you if you have indeed noticed what seems to be a serious drive to get people to invest their money in the Stock Exchange.

The truth is you’re still effectively taking a chance if you invest in the financial markets, whether as an investor who’s buying stocks outright or if you’re a trader seeking to take advantage of the liquidity of the markets (the short-term movement of the value of shares). While a lot of people make a lot of money playing the markets in this way, a whole lot more lose a lot of their money.

It’s perhaps a bit of an overly simplistic way of putting it, but it’s true that for every winner there has to be a loser. In the case of Contracts For Differences (CFDs) which are essentially derivatives, and I suppose in the case of outright shares investing as well, this view tends to be markedly skewed against the majority. For every big winner there are effectively a lot of losers, many of whom only lose a little bit of their money at a time and so don’t really feel the losses in the grander scheme of things.

The biggest winner however is the house and I refer to it as being the “house” because quite frankly, online trading is not unlike gambling. Nobody can ever say with absolute certainty whether or not a particular stock is going to go up or down. The only people who have this type of information are those operating on the inside and they’re not allowed to make use of it to trade as that would equate to insider trading, which is a criminal offence.

But yes, the biggest winner is indeed the trading platform over which everybody is chasing their own personal profits – the broker. It’s as simple as this – for every trade that is executed by each trader, whether buying or selling, the online trading platform (broker) charges a fee, so they are the ones who make the real money.

Imagine a scenario where just a modest total of 2,000 trades are made in just one hour, which is not uncommon. Say the broker charges what appears to be a very low service fee of $2 per trade. That would equate to $4,000 made in just one hour, better yet (for the brokers) if those were derivative trades such as CFDs.

The broker holds on to the value of the real shares they own, while derivatives traders slug it out over whether or not the price of those shares is going up or going down.

I’m in no way trying to discourage anyone from chasing their personal fortune through trading, but perhaps investing in brokerage companies themselves (getting a share of the ownership of an online trading platform) is a better avenue to pursue if you want a little bit more of a predictable manner in which to build up some good earnings. So I’d encourage investing in an actual start-up brokerage over the act of trading itself, although I must add that it is indeed possible to make some good money as a trader or an investor in shares. For many people, trading is just a convenient way of catering to the high risk portion of diversifying their investment portfolios.

What to Look For in a Broker

What to Look For in a Broker

If you’ve ever watched the Wolf of Wall Street, you might be forgiven for not placing any trust in brokers because they’re just out to make you move your money so that they can make commission, right? Well, while that is true to certain extent, it largely depends on which financial service you’re looking to purchase. Even if somebody cold-calls you offering you a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity” to invest in some product you “simply can’t do without any longer,” it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re out to just get a chunk of your money while it changes hands.

Yes, brokers do essentially make money through commission, but believe it or not, you can get a good broker if you know what to look for.

Once-off Commission Structure

Brokers are generally supposed to be there to make your life easier in terms of any investments you may want to make, be it to buy medical insurance coverage, household or auto insurance or if you want to invest some of your money with the view of multiplying it through some passive earnings. Brokers are also there to make the lives of financial service providers they’re recruiting for easier, so they’re essentially middlemen who bring clients together with the financial service provider.

That’s precisely the place you need to look in order to ensure you’re dealing with a good broker – their remuneration structure in line with the financial service provider they’re representing. Generally, if it’s a once-off commission structure, the broker is likely to be a good one because their bread and butter is dependent upon them building up a reputation for themselves. So every new client will likely look at that broker’s track-record to make a decision on whether or not to act on the advice of said broker.

If the commission structure is more like what is discussed in the Wolf of Wall Street, where the broker earns a commission each time they complete the equivalent of “making a trade for you,” it’s very easy for that broker to shift over to the dark side and just push to have you making as many of those trades as possible. So this would likely be that type of broker who approaches you with the prospect of you investing your money.

It goes a little deeper than that however because if a broker operates on a perpetual commission based structure, they aren’t necessarily bad. You can always stop investing through them if it becomes clear that all they’re pushing for is for you to give the thumbs-up for your money moving from one investment to the other so that they can earn their commission. The distinction to make in this instance is whether or not the broker is independent of the financial service provider they’re representing or if they have a vested interest in the form of some or other ownership.

Otherwise some common sense should apply in choosing a broker, with your due diligence in selecting one perhaps including somewhat of a background check. What are other clients saying about this particular broker? You need to ask some specific questions, like whether or not the terms they negotiated with an insurer for a client worked out well for that client when they filed a claim, for example. If a broker wants to rush you into making an investment, it’s perhaps a sign that you should rather look elsewhere.

Shouldn’t ALL Economists Be Rich?

Shouldn’t ALL Economists Be Rich?

I remember back at Uni, during my first year when I’d actually enrolled for an engineering course before switching to commerce, a young lad quite rudely asked the calculus lecturer just what on earth we were being taught during a specific lesson would help us with in our application of that “knowledge.” That guy (who’s probably a fully qualified engineer by now) went on to shape my entire professional life as that’s perhaps the defining moment which made me question just what I was doing there, learning about integration and what not. Perhaps he’ll never know it, but he definitely contributed to me being in the financial industry.

I must say that that wasn’t my final encounter with calculus in some form or the other, because in the actuarial sciences (which form only part of my profession), we did indeed learn about integration and the likes, but with more of a theoretic feel to it so as to help develop and maintain the various financial systems used throughout the entire financial industry. If it’s all about making money, I really thought that the best way to do that was right in the middle of the financial industry, and so I said goodbye to what would have been my engineering degree.

Anyway, questions around the education we pay so much money for keep haunting me to this day and I often sympathise with people who ask questions like “Shouldn’t all economists be rich?” I mean they’re all experts in their field, which is the field of how the financial sector works. Economists have all the inside knowledge, don’t they, and so they should know how to take advantage of this knowledge to make themselves wealthy?

You see them featured on all those business and money shows, giving their expert opinion on what the market is going to do. Some are even willed to pick what they deem to be hot stocks or hot investments which they believe will be the next biggest movers of the market, as possible cases for the eager onlooker to make a bit of money for themselves. I can’t count how many times an economist has gotten their predictions horribly wrong however, which brings us back to the question of whether or not all economists should indeed be rich.

With a strong scientific background as well, I’ve often questioned the inner-workings of the financial system myself, wondering whether or not is should follow more of a scientific methodology. What I discovered though, through my ground-level experience working in the financial sector, is that economists and pretty much anyone else working in the financial industry gets equipped with fundamental knowledge of how the financial system works. Just like economists, we all study what is essentially the “science” which drives the operation of the financial system. What economists aren’t privy to is the type of information available to candidates for insider trading. Well they perhaps are, but they simply cannot make use of that information to enrich themselves, otherwise they’d be indicted for insider trading.

Financing a Courier Business

Financing a Courier Business

With online deliveries being popular, particularly at this time of year, a sound business option is the courier industry. As our lives become increasingly global, increasingly digital, we can order everything from groceries to books, some guaranteeing a one hour delivery slot. The industry continues to thrive, with big names being rivalled by independent companies. With companies such as Yodel and Deliveroo, the face of delivery across all strands is changing, as cyclists and every day drivers are drafted in to help get packages out there. Even the mighty Amazon announced Flex this year, which pays people in specific cities to deliver parcels.

Such a thriving industry that seems set to continue growing is something that investors can do well on, as we head toward even more online shopping. Some considerations for investing in or financing a delivery business are covered below:

Delivering on Time

The most important thing is for a delivery company to ensure that deliveries arrive on time. Check how the company you are considering financing intend to do this, what their history looks like concerning this and what compensation procedures they have in place. Delivery is largely based on word of mouth, particularly in the beginning, and that relies on timely arrival.

Delivering a Happy

One of the most important parts of being a delivery person is friendliness, since it is a customer facing role. This is how reputation is built, and as such, you should be sure that the people being used for delivery fit the criteria! A successful delivery business delivers on time and goes the extra mile. Find out how the delivery service you’re looking at investing in intends to vet their drivers.

Delivering Tech

There is nothing more frustrating than awaiting a delivery which gets missed and then having to wait two days before you can even access it. Opting for good communication with drivers, and good tech to allow tracking reduces the likelihood of this. You will need to provide finance for this key area.

Delivering Locally or Globally

Deciding where to deliver to will involve some market research. Companies such as InXpress are aggregators, which help consumers decide which delivery option is best, and as such have a wealth of information about shipping and delivery in the UK and beyond. Use resources and experts’ knowledge to help you gain a better understanding of the shipping and delivery industry.