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Everything is For Sale, Including Debt

Everything is For Sale, Including Debt

As the saying goes, “Everything is for sale, you just have to come up with the right amount to make the purchase” and if you think about it you’ll realise that this is actually true. I’m not just talking about those scenarios where sentiment and desire seem to defy economic logic and trump real market value here. I’m talking about sales which go on without the majority of us even knowing about them. Debt is a very big seller in the world right now, yet it all happens within the darker corners of what’s otherwise plain view as most people choose to turn a blind eye to it going on.

Debt is being sold all day, every day and its trade never stops for single second. For as long as the world is turning, debt is being bought and sold somewhere around the world if not everywhere, you just don’t know it’s going on.

The basic forms of debt are rather straight-forward in their makeup and can take the shape of something like getting financed by the bank to buy your car, for which you’d make weekly or monthly repayments with added interest of course, so something like your mortgage or bond you have on your house which will take a much longer period of up to 20-30 years to pay off.

More sophisticated forms of trading debt are where the real money is made due to one of the most powerful tools of the financial sector; leverage. If a company offering financial services has been given the green light by the Financial Conduct Authority to operate within many different sub-sectors of the financial sector, they in effect hold the true power of leverage and gearing in their hands to generate insane amount of money, mostly through the business of trading debt.

Why do you think an insurance company is seemingly never satisfied with just doing insurance? They’d much rather offer financial services which span the entire insurance sector and given half the chance they’d expand into other financial services such as housing a resident banking branch or even brokerage for services such as offering the public a CFDs and stocks trading platform. In the case of offering a trading platform, licensed brokers are themselves traders and make use of leverage to make huge profits while charging traders a service fee for each trade or perhaps levying a spread fee instead of a fixed per-trade fee.

What’s ultimately at play here is debt because financial services companies can list the credit they hold on their books as assets, assets which can then be repackaged and sold or used as collateral to fund expansion operations or further investments.

Nothing sells like debt and when you earn interest on the money you have in a savings account (although it must be said that this is very little interest you earn) you are indirectly participating in the trading of debt. The money which you keep in the bank is being loaned out to other clients and some of the interest they pay on that loan is filtered down to you, but you’re really just getting scraps because banks have the authority to use leverage to loan out more money than what they physically have in reserve.

Whenever some investors or businesspeople who’ve been active in other spheres of business finally head on over to the financial sector, they often wonder just why they didn’t make the transition earlier. Because of the way in which our financial sector is set up and operates, often making insane amounts of profits is as easy as getting the right finance leads, which are known to be of high quality since financial services have become a very important if not critical part of our everyday lives.

So, the message for you today is that you should perhaps take the time to think about what exactly you’re spending your money on. You can either buy or sell debt and if you do it cleverly, you can enjoy some big financial rewards.

Exploring the Financial Lifecycle of a Cash-Cow Industry

Exploring the Financial Lifecycle of a Cash-Cow Industry

In every generation there’s at least one event or one product which changes things around completely, making a few people extremely wealthy while spawning a lot of secondary markets which run parallel to whatever that major paradigm shift is. It happens in just about every area of our lives, from solving a problem which is associated with our basic needs to even something like entertainment.

Major events, discoveries, inventions etc. such as oil, the VCR machine, the internet etc. are perfect examples of such paradigm shifts. The development of a major cash-cow industry often takes place within another major paradigm shift, such as social networking as one way in which the internet developed, or fuel to power our cars as a way in which the discovery of oil was developed. With regards to the financial lifecycle of these major cash-cow industries, an understanding thereof could perhaps help you become a better investor if you have some money set aside to perhaps take a chance on industries falling outside of your regular way of earning a living.

Stage One – The Initial Boom

The initial boom stage of a major cash-cow industry is often just a precursor to what will effectively be a second boom, where all the real money will change hands. Let’s take the internet as an example – when the internet first really took shape, it was nothing more than a network of connected computers and the very idea fascinated only a few geeky people in the entire world. No serious money really changed hands during the initial growth phase of the internet and investors weren’t exactly queuing up to “invest in the internet.” The only money which can be directly associated with this stage is that of early adopters who sort of see the new paradigm as something which they just enjoy exploring, entertaining and developing, or indeed something which they can develop into something really useful in future. This leads us to the next stage.

Stage Two – The Explosion

When someone finally makes use of the discovery, paradigm or invention to create something really useful, a financial explosion of sorts takes place. This leveraging of the original paradigm to create something that explodes into popularity can take any form, but the most common form is if it solves some sort of problem. Sticking with our example of the internet, you can think of the Google search engine (now part of the parent company called Alphabet) as a great example of someone (or two guys) taking the original invention of the World Wide Web and creating something which solves a problem and goes on to become a runaway success.

This is when the true power of the original invention or original idea / discovery / paradigm comes into focus as something which can be really useful – something which has some real power, during which time a lot of investment comes pouring into this and other similar developments. It essentially becomes a race against time and a competition to see who will ultimately “get it right” and explode into prominence. This is when to place investment bets because you can make some serious cash if the development you bet on eventually goes on to list or perhaps gets acquired.

Stage Three – The Derivative Phase

Operating within patent laws, the main paradigm which proves to be popular naturally sparks some competition, in the form of developers trying to develop a better product which does the same job, but one which will be in direct competition with the most popular product. Think Yahoo and Bing which tried to take on Google to dominate the search engine market. There were many other search engines as well, but I mean we can only declare one clear winner.

Stage Four – The Peak

At this stage it’s perhaps too late to look towards investing because the only real way you can do that is through buying stocks, which are already expensive and have already made a lot of people rich. Some cash-cow industries die out at this stage, while others like Google diversify and explore other avenues through which to reinvent the cash-cow and keep the profits flowing in. If you’re lucky, you can still make a lot of money through these diversifications.